Ratings: Top 5 Card Games to Play in a Pub – with Actualol

Check "Top 5 Card Games to Play in a Pub" and find the best price on all items from the top among sellers all over in the Netherlands & Belgium!

#5. Skull

Edited description from Bruno Faidutti's write-up of the game in his Ideal Game Library:

Skull & Roses is the quintessence of bluffing, a game in which everything is played in the players' heads. Each player plays a face-down card, then each player in turn adds one more card – until someone feels safe enough to state that he can turn a number of cards face up and get only roses. Other players can then overbid him, saying they can turn even more cards face up. The highest bidder must then turn that number of cards face up, starting with his own. If he shows only roses, he wins; if he reveals a skull, he loses, placing one of his cards out of play. Two successful challenges wins the game. Skull & Roses is not a game of luck; it's a game of poker face and meeting eyes.

Skull & Roses Red features the same gameplay as Skull & Roses, with the only change being alternate rules that allow each player to control two biker gangs. Both Skull & Roses Red and Skull are playable on their own, with each game containing six different biker gangs. Each Skull or Skull & Roses set can be combined with another to allow for games with more than six players.

7.2
3-6 Players
15-45 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.1
Language: 1.0

Edited description from Bruno Faidutti's write-up of the game in his Ideal Game Library:

Skull & Roses is the quintessence of bluffing, a game in which everything is played in the players' heads. Each player plays a face-down card, then each player in turn adds one more card – until someone feels safe enough to state that he can turn a number of cards face up and get only roses. Other players can then overbid him, saying they can turn even more cards face up. The highest bidder must then turn that number of cards face up, starting with his own. If he shows only roses, he wins; if he reveals a skull, he loses, placing one of his cards out of play. Two successful challenges wins the game. Skull & Roses is not a game of luck; it's a game of poker face and meeting eyes.

Skull & Roses Red features the same gameplay as Skull & Roses, with the only change being alternate rules that allow each player to control two biker gangs. Both Skull & Roses Red and Skull are playable on their own, with each game containing six different biker gangs. Each Skull or Skull & Roses set can be combined with another to allow for games with more than six players.

7.2
3-6 Players
15-45 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.1
Language: 1.0
Not available
at the moment
#4. That's not Lemonade!

It's lemonade season and you run a successful lemonade stand. Unfortunately, today you're not the only lemonade stand on the block. To settle this problem, you and your rivals agree to a lemonade drinking contest. But wait, something's wrong! Little Johnny, the neighborhood menace, is up to no good. During this contest you might take a gulp of something ... THAT'S NOT LEMONADE!

That's Not Lemonade is the simplest press-your-luck game there is. On your turn, decide if you will take a card or pass. If you get a That's Not Lemonade card, you're out for the round. The player with the most lemon cards at the end of the round wins a lemon card. First player to win 3 lemons wins.

Comes with 18 cards, 6 player tiles, and 6 mini cups.

It's the drinking game for kids!

6.1
2-6 Players
10 Min
Age: 8+
Complexity: 1.0

It's lemonade season and you run a successful lemonade stand. Unfortunately, today you're not the only lemonade stand on the block. To settle this problem, you and your rivals agree to a lemonade drinking contest. But wait, something's wrong! Little Johnny, the neighborhood menace, is up to no good. During this contest you might take a gulp of something ... THAT'S NOT LEMONADE!

That's Not Lemonade is the simplest press-your-luck game there is. On your turn, decide if you will take a card or pass. If you get a That's Not Lemonade card, you're out for the round. The player with the most lemon cards at the end of the round wins a lemon card. First player to win 3 lemons wins.

Comes with 18 cards, 6 player tiles, and 6 mini cups.

It's the drinking game for kids!

6.1
2-6 Players
10 Min
Age: 8+
Complexity: 1.0
Not available
at the moment
#3. For Sale (2021)

For Sale is a quick, fun game nominally about buying and selling real estate. During the game's two distinct phases, players first bid for several buildings then, after all buildings have been bought, sell the buildings for the greatest profit possible.

The original Ravensburger/FX Schmid edition (1997/98) has slightly different rules than later English editions, and only 20 buildings instead of 30.

The Ãœberplay 2005 Edition has new art, rules and card distribution changes, and it accommodates 3-6 players.

The Gryphon 2009 Edition uses the Überplay art for the faces of the property cards, while replacing most other art. The rules are the same as the Überplay edition, with the exception of the rounding rule (which was stated in different ways in different printings of the Überplay edition).

Rounding rule

The rounding rule preferred by the designer Stefan Dorra is that players get back half of their bid rounded DOWN (not UP), as confirmed in correspondence with him here and here. A history of how the rounding rule has changed in different editions is documented here.

7.2
3-6 Players
30 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.3
Language: 1.0

For Sale is a quick, fun game nominally about buying and selling real estate. During the game's two distinct phases, players first bid for several buildings then, after all buildings have been bought, sell the buildings for the greatest profit possible.

The original Ravensburger/FX Schmid edition (1997/98) has slightly different rules than later English editions, and only 20 buildings instead of 30.

The Ãœberplay 2005 Edition has new art, rules and card distribution changes, and it accommodates 3-6 players.

The Gryphon 2009 Edition uses the Überplay art for the faces of the property cards, while replacing most other art. The rules are the same as the Überplay edition, with the exception of the rounding rule (which was stated in different ways in different printings of the Überplay edition).

Rounding rule

The rounding rule preferred by the designer Stefan Dorra is that players get back half of their bid rounded DOWN (not UP), as confirmed in correspondence with him here and here. A history of how the rounding rule has changed in different editions is documented here.

7.2
3-6 Players
30 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.3
Language: 1.0
Not available
at the moment
#2. High Society

In Reiner Knizia's High Society, players bid against each other to acquire the various trappings of wealth (positive-number and multiplier cards) while avoiding its pitfalls (negative number and divisor cards). While bidding, though, keep an eye on your remaining cash - at the end of the game, even though all those positive-number cards might add up to a win, the player with the least money isn't even considered for victory.

In 2003 re-published by Ãœberplay.

In 2003 published with a new theme by Amigo as Einfach Tierisch.

In 2006, published by University Games as Animalement Vôtre (French version) and Beestenveiling (Dutch version).

In 2008, re-published by Eagle-Gryphon Games

In 2018, re-published by Osprey Games

7.1
3-5 Players
15-30 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.5
Language: 1.0

In Reiner Knizia's High Society, players bid against each other to acquire the various trappings of wealth (positive-number and multiplier cards) while avoiding its pitfalls (negative number and divisor cards). While bidding, though, keep an eye on your remaining cash - at the end of the game, even though all those positive-number cards might add up to a win, the player with the least money isn't even considered for victory.

In 2003 re-published by Ãœberplay.

In 2003 published with a new theme by Amigo as Einfach Tierisch.

In 2006, published by University Games as Animalement Vôtre (French version) and Beestenveiling (Dutch version).

In 2008, re-published by Eagle-Gryphon Games

In 2018, re-published by Osprey Games

7.1
3-5 Players
15-30 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.5
Language: 1.0
Not available
at the moment
#1. No Thanks!

No Thanks! is a card game designed to be as simple as it is engaging.

The rules are simple. Each turn, players have two options:

play one of their chips to avoid picking up the current face-up card

pick up the face-up card (along with any chips that have already been played on that card) and turn over the next card

However, the choices aren't so easy as players compete to have the lowest score at the end of the game. The deck of cards is numbered from 3 to 35, with each card counting for a number of points equal to its face value. Runs of two or more cards only count as the lowest value in the run - but nine cards are removed from the deck before starting, so be careful looking for connectors. Each chip is worth -1 point, but they can be even more valuable by allowing you to avoid drawing that unwanted card.

The first versions of the game supported up to five players, but a 2011 edition supports up to seven.

This game was originally published in Germany by Amigo as Geschenkt ...ist noch zu teuer!, meaning Even given as a gift, it is still too expensive!. Amigo's international edition, titled No Merci! (a delightful multi-lingual pun), had rules in several languages, including English. The game has subsequently been released in other countries under an assortment of names.

7.1
3-7 Players
20 Min
Age: 8+
Complexity: 1.1
Language: 1.0

No Thanks! is a card game designed to be as simple as it is engaging.

The rules are simple. Each turn, players have two options:

play one of their chips to avoid picking up the current face-up card

pick up the face-up card (along with any chips that have already been played on that card) and turn over the next card

However, the choices aren't so easy as players compete to have the lowest score at the end of the game. The deck of cards is numbered from 3 to 35, with each card counting for a number of points equal to its face value. Runs of two or more cards only count as the lowest value in the run - but nine cards are removed from the deck before starting, so be careful looking for connectors. Each chip is worth -1 point, but they can be even more valuable by allowing you to avoid drawing that unwanted card.

The first versions of the game supported up to five players, but a 2011 edition supports up to seven.

This game was originally published in Germany by Amigo as Geschenkt ...ist noch zu teuer!, meaning Even given as a gift, it is still too expensive!. Amigo's international edition, titled No Merci! (a delightful multi-lingual pun), had rules in several languages, including English. The game has subsequently been released in other countries under an assortment of names.

7.1
3-7 Players
20 Min
Age: 8+
Complexity: 1.1
Language: 1.0
Not available
at the moment

Ratings: Top 5 Card Games to Play in a Pub – with Actualol

Check "Top 5 Card Games to Play in a Pub" and find the best price on all items from the top among sellers all over in the Netherlands & Belgium!

#5. Skull

Edited description from Bruno Faidutti's write-up of the game in his Ideal Game Library:

Skull & Roses is the quintessence of bluffing, a game in which everything is played in the players' heads. Each player plays a face-down card, then each player in turn adds one more card – until someone feels safe enough to state that he can turn a number of cards face up and get only roses. Other players can then overbid him, saying they can turn even more cards face up. The highest bidder must then turn that number of cards face up, starting with his own. If he shows only roses, he wins; if he reveals a skull, he loses, placing one of his cards out of play. Two successful challenges wins the game. Skull & Roses is not a game of luck; it's a game of poker face and meeting eyes.

Skull & Roses Red features the same gameplay as Skull & Roses, with the only change being alternate rules that allow each player to control two biker gangs. Both Skull & Roses Red and Skull are playable on their own, with each game containing six different biker gangs. Each Skull or Skull & Roses set can be combined with another to allow for games with more than six players.

7.2
3-6 Players
15-45 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.1
Language: 1.0
#4. That's not Lemonade!

It's lemonade season and you run a successful lemonade stand. Unfortunately, today you're not the only lemonade stand on the block. To settle this problem, you and your rivals agree to a lemonade drinking contest. But wait, something's wrong! Little Johnny, the neighborhood menace, is up to no good. During this contest you might take a gulp of something ... THAT'S NOT LEMONADE!

That's Not Lemonade is the simplest press-your-luck game there is. On your turn, decide if you will take a card or pass. If you get a That's Not Lemonade card, you're out for the round. The player with the most lemon cards at the end of the round wins a lemon card. First player to win 3 lemons wins.

Comes with 18 cards, 6 player tiles, and 6 mini cups.

It's the drinking game for kids!

6.1
2-6 Players
10 Min
Age: 8+
Complexity: 1.0
#3. For Sale (2021)

For Sale is a quick, fun game nominally about buying and selling real estate. During the game's two distinct phases, players first bid for several buildings then, after all buildings have been bought, sell the buildings for the greatest profit possible.

The original Ravensburger/FX Schmid edition (1997/98) has slightly different rules than later English editions, and only 20 buildings instead of 30.

The Ãœberplay 2005 Edition has new art, rules and card distribution changes, and it accommodates 3-6 players.

The Gryphon 2009 Edition uses the Überplay art for the faces of the property cards, while replacing most other art. The rules are the same as the Überplay edition, with the exception of the rounding rule (which was stated in different ways in different printings of the Überplay edition).

Rounding rule

The rounding rule preferred by the designer Stefan Dorra is that players get back half of their bid rounded DOWN (not UP), as confirmed in correspondence with him here and here. A history of how the rounding rule has changed in different editions is documented here.

7.2
3-6 Players
30 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.3
Language: 1.0
#2. High Society

In Reiner Knizia's High Society, players bid against each other to acquire the various trappings of wealth (positive-number and multiplier cards) while avoiding its pitfalls (negative number and divisor cards). While bidding, though, keep an eye on your remaining cash - at the end of the game, even though all those positive-number cards might add up to a win, the player with the least money isn't even considered for victory.

In 2003 re-published by Ãœberplay.

In 2003 published with a new theme by Amigo as Einfach Tierisch.

In 2006, published by University Games as Animalement Vôtre (French version) and Beestenveiling (Dutch version).

In 2008, re-published by Eagle-Gryphon Games

In 2018, re-published by Osprey Games

7.1
3-5 Players
15-30 Min
Age: 10+
Complexity: 1.5
Language: 1.0
#1. No Thanks!

No Thanks! is a card game designed to be as simple as it is engaging.

The rules are simple. Each turn, players have two options:

play one of their chips to avoid picking up the current face-up card

pick up the face-up card (along with any chips that have already been played on that card) and turn over the next card

However, the choices aren't so easy as players compete to have the lowest score at the end of the game. The deck of cards is numbered from 3 to 35, with each card counting for a number of points equal to its face value. Runs of two or more cards only count as the lowest value in the run - but nine cards are removed from the deck before starting, so be careful looking for connectors. Each chip is worth -1 point, but they can be even more valuable by allowing you to avoid drawing that unwanted card.

The first versions of the game supported up to five players, but a 2011 edition supports up to seven.

This game was originally published in Germany by Amigo as Geschenkt ...ist noch zu teuer!, meaning Even given as a gift, it is still too expensive!. Amigo's international edition, titled No Merci! (a delightful multi-lingual pun), had rules in several languages, including English. The game has subsequently been released in other countries under an assortment of names.

7.1
3-7 Players
20 Min
Age: 8+
Complexity: 1.1
Language: 1.0